By Barron Segar

All of us at World Food Program USA have been heartbroken by the startling images of grieving families and devastated communities coming out of Haiti following the 7.2 magnitude earthquake on Saturday. As of August 16, the effects of the earthquake include over 1,300 fatalities, more than 5,000 people injured and 4,000 homes destroyed.

Americans watching and reading the breaking news reports are reminded of the devastation Haiti has already endured, including the massive earthquake in 2010 that left more than 200,000 dead and countless families homeless. The country is still recovering, even a decade later. Now, this quake is impacting vulnerable families as they deal with the increased threat of COVID-19, as well as multiple manmade crises: political instability, gang violence and high food prices. Even before this weekend’s earthquake, nearly half the population – 4.4 million people – needed immediate food assistance and over 1.2 million of them are suffering from severe hunger.

The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) is working closely with the Haitian government and authorities on the front lines of this emergency to support logistics efforts, transport lifesaving supplies and humanitarian workers to affected areas, and deliver emergency food assistance to people in field hospitals in Les Cayes and Jérémie. And, thanks to the U.S. government’s Agency for International Development (USAID), we have 3,500 metric tons of food prepositioned across the country to respond swiftly in case of disasters such as this one. This includes rice, beans and vegetable oil and can support up to 270,000 people for one month.

But a month-long state of emergency has just been declared by the government, and survivors will need weeks of support to get back on their feet.

We cannot do this work alone. I’m calling on the American people to please give their most generous gift today so we can ramp up our logistics response and rush lifesaving support to the people of Haiti. With your donation, the U.N. World Food Programme can deliver food to help people in urgent need when disaster strikes. A gift of $75 can provide an emergency box of food that can feed a family of five for an entire month. Please donate today.

###

The United Nations World Food Programme is the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and the world’s largest humanitarian organization, saving lives in emergencies and using food assistance to build a pathway to peace, stability and prosperity for people recovering from conflict, disasters and the impact of climate change.

World Food Program USA, a 501©(3) organization based in Washington, DC, proudly supports the mission of the United Nations World Food Programme by mobilizing American policymakers, businesses and individuals to advance the global movement to end hunger. Our leadership and support help to bolster an enduring American legacy of feeding families in need around the world. To learn more about World Food Program USA’s mission, please visit wfpusa.org/about-us.

Media Contact:
Bo Bartley
Senior Manager, Public Relations
bbartley@wfpusa.org
202-627-3737

KINSHASA – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) has started providing emergency food rations to people displaced from their homes in Goma by the sudden eruption of Nyiragongo volcano on May 22.

The U.N. World Food Programme and partners have so far delivered food to some 43,000 displaced people in Sake, Minova and Rutshuru, towns close to Goma that have seen an influx of people fleeing their homes.  Thousands of displaced people remain scattered across the region amid warnings of further eruptions. Those who have had to flee their homes have been receiving 10-day rations of flour, legumes, oil and salt.

“People are feeling helpless and getting desperate. The families that have fled are completely reliant on government and aid agencies for basics like food, water and shelter,” said Erwan Rumen, the U.N. World Food Programme’s Eastern Area Coordinator. “The U.N. World Food Programme is very concerned about the food and nutrition situation of the people forced out of their homes. We are providing them with the food assistance they need in this crisis.”

The eruption left more than 30 dead and caused an estimated 400,000 people to either flee their homes or to be evacuated. Families who left with their few belongings, either headed north on foot on the Rutshuru/Beni road, recently cleared of the lava that had blocked it, or round the lake towards the towns of Sake and Minova, located 17 miles and 29 miles west of Goma, respectively. Some with vehicles continued further south to Bukavu.

Based on assessments carried out over the past week, the U.N. World Food Programme aims to reach a total of 40,000 people in Sake, 65,000 in Minova and 60,000 in Rutshuru, while the U.N. World Food Programme in Rwanda is providing emergency food assistance to many others who have crossed the border.

Jointly with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the U.N. World Food Programme is also delivering food to 300 children who have been separated from their families in the chaos that followed the eruption.

North Kivu is already facing armed conflict, mainly in Beni territory where attacks on civilians continue. In efforts to bring stability to this conflict-hit province, the government has declared a security emergency there, and in Ituri, immediately to the north. Shortly after military rule was introduced, Nyiragongo erupted.

Notes to editor:

For high-resolution pictures, click here.

The United Nations World Food Programme is the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate.  We are the world’s largest humanitarian organization, saving lives in emergencies and using food assistance to build a pathway to peace, stability and prosperity for people recovering from conflict, disasters and the impact of climate change.

Follow us on Twitter @WFPUSA, @wfp_media and @WFPDRC

It’s been two years since Cyclone Idai ravaged central Mozambique, leaving destroyed lives and struggling communities in its wake. Since then, the vulnerable country has faced ongoing conflict, contested elections, drought and more devastating weather. 

Then, Cyclone Eloise made landfall in January of 2021,  destroying vital infrastructure and thousands of homes, dealing another devastating blow to families still trying to put their lives together after Cyclone Idai. In the north of the country, nearly 1 million people are facing a hunger crisis driven by violence, ongoing attacks from  climate shocks and skyrocketing food prices.

Here’s a look back at our story of recovery post-Idai, one year after the storm:  

BEIRA/JOHANNESBURG – A year after Cyclone Idai devastated much of central Mozambique, limited funding for essential reconstruction is preventing many of the hardest-hit people from getting back on their feet, according to the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP).

In the weeks after the strongest storm to ever hit the country, the U.N. World Food Programme’s emergency assistance kick-started the recovery of 1.8 million people. But many others, who are still struggling today, face a bleak and uncertain future.

Last month, funding shortfalls forced the U.N. World Food Programme to halve food rations for 525,000 people working on post-Idai recovery projects in the province of Sofala, the most damaged by the cyclone. This month, that vital support will be halted completely unless the U.N. World Food Programme receives funds soon.

“For people who had their lives turned upside down, our projects – community farms, road and bridge repair, the rebuilding of schools – are a source of hope,” said Lola Castro, the U.N. World Food Programme’s Regional Director for Southern Africa. “This essential work must continue if we want to see real and lasting recovery,” Castro added.

The upcoming April-May harvest is expected to be relatively good in the region. However, few of the 250,000 families whose homes were damaged by the cyclone have been able to return to their villages, let alone rebuild.

The U.N. World Food Programme needs $91 million to be able to fully implement rehabilitation projects for Idai victims this year.

Many are subsistence farmers whose crops were wiped out last year and who were unable to replant in time for this year. Most are enduring “crisis” or “emergency” levels of food insecurity, meaning they do not eat enough, borrow what they can from relatives or friends, forage for less-than-nourishing wild foods, and continue to need outside help to survive.

Mozambique has one of the highest rates of chronic malnutrition in the world – afflicting 43 percent of children under five – while acute malnutrition is on the rise among Idai-affected communities. A rare outbreak of Pellagra, a disease triggered by Vitamin B3 deficiency, has sickened almost 4,000 people in Sofala, with the numbers increasing rapidly.

Given the country’s heavy dependence on rain-fed, small-scale farming and its vulnerability to climate change – as underscored by Cyclone Kenneth causing widespread devastation just six weeks after Idai – significantly more investment is needed in climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction.

“Boosting Mozambicans’ ability to withstand the impacts of increasingly severe drought and flooding was the core of our work before the cyclones struck,” said Castro. “It’s what we must resume now, and, with partners, step up in the coming years.”

###

The U.N. World Food Programme is the world’s largest humanitarian organization, saving lives in emergencies, building prosperity and supporting a sustainable future for people recovering from conflict, disasters and the impact of climate change.

Follow us on Twitter @WFPUSA and @wfp_Africa

For more information please contact (email address: firstname.lastname@wfp.org): Steve Taravella, WFP/Washington, Tel. +1 202 653 1149

This is a summary of what was said by WFP spokesperson Tomson Phiri – to whom quoted text may be attributed – at today’s press briefing at the Palais des Nations in Geneva, Switzerland.

GENEVA – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) is currently conducting needs assessments with the Government of Mozambique and partners. In order to have a full picture of the impact of the devastating cyclone and the extent of the damage, the U.N. World Food Programme is supporting both on ground and aerial assessments undertaken with drones.

While the full extent of needs will be revealed once ongoing assessments have been concluded, early indications are that the storm has further aggravated the precarious food security situation in Sofala province. People need food assistance now to cope and will need support to re-establish their livelihoods going forward.

The tropical cyclone comes at a very difficult time in Mozambique. January to March is the peak lean season – when people struggle the most to find food. Latest statistics from the IPC Acute Food Insecurity and Acute Malnutrition Analysis project that over 2.9 million people are facing high levels of food insecurity in rural and urban areas.

Ahead of the storm, the U.N. World Food Programme mobilized emergency stocks to support 100,000 people as part of its immediate response. A total of 640 metric tons (MT) of food is available in a U.N. World Food Programme central warehouse in Beira city and in the southern hub in Maputo, which can be trucked to affected areas across Sofala province. These resources are for the U.N. World Food Programme’s ongoing lean season response but can be utilized to provide life-saving assistance to people hard hit by Tropical Cyclone Eloise. However, more resources will be urgently needed to ensure we can mount an adequate response in a timely manner.

#                                 #                                              #

The U.N. World Food Programme is the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate.  We are the world’s largest humanitarian organization, saving lives in emergencies and using food assistance to build a pathway to peace, stability and prosperity for people recovering from conflict, disasters and the impact of climate change.

Follow us on Twitter @WFPUSA @wfp_media

For more information, contact: 

Tomson Phiri, WFP/Geneva, Tomson.Phiri@wfp.org, Mob. +41 79 842 8057

ANTANANARIVO – Three consecutive years of drought coupled with a sharp recession triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic will leave a third of the population in Southern Madagascar struggling to put food on the table. With severe malnutrition rates continuing to spiral and many children forced to beg in order to help their families eat, urgent action is required to prevent a humanitarian crisis.

With drought conditions persisting into 2021 and a poor last harvest, weary communities have few resources to fall back on and many have had to leave their homes in search of food and work. Some 1.35 million people are projected to be food insecure – 35% of the region’s population. The figure is nearly double what it was in the same period last year.

The COVID-19 pandemic has added to the hardship, causing seasonal employment to dry up. Many families relied on this income to get through the lean season, which peaks between January and April.

“To survive, families are eating tamarind fruit mixed with clay,” says Moumini Ouedraogo, United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) Representative in Madagascar. “We can’t face another year like this. With no rain and a poor harvest, people will face starvation. No one should have to live like this.”

Children are worst affected by the food crisis and most of them have dropped out of schools to beg for food in the streets. A U.N. World Food Programme assessment in Amboasary in October 2020 found that three out of four children are absent from school – mostly to help their parents forage for food.

The prevalence of Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) in children under 5 in the three most affected regions (Androy, Anôsy and Atsimo Andrefana) stands at 10.7%. This is the second highest rate in the East and Southern Africa region. The most recent projections put the number of children likely to suffer from acute malnutrition at more than 135,000, with more than 27,000 of these being classified as severe.

The U.N. World Food Programme currently provides food assistance for almost 500,000 severely food-insecure people in the nine hardest hit districts in the South. Given the rapidly deteriorating situation, by June 2021, the U.N. World Food Programme intends to scale up its assistance to reach almost 900,000 of those most vulnerable. However, support will be needed for struggling families well beyond the current lean season.

The U.N. World Food Programme urgently needs $35 million to fund lifesaving food and cash distributions and malnutrition treatment programs. This also includes emergency school feeding for 150,000 children to ensure they can stay in school and build a more secure future.

Broadcast quality video available here.

High-resolution photos available here.

#                             #                       #

The U.N. World Food Programme is the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate.  We are the world’s largest humanitarian organization, saving lives in emergencies and using food assistance to build a pathway to peace, stability and prosperity for people recovering from conflict, disasters and the impact of climate change.

Follow us on Twitter @WFPUSA; @wfp_media; @WFP_Africa; @PAM_Madagascar

Lilongwe, Malawi – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) today welcomes a generous contribution of $10.3 million from the United States Government, through USAID’s Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance (BHA), to provide emergency assistance to vulnerable households and support the livelihoods of communities in Malawi.

The U.N. World Food Programme will use part of this contribution ($7 million) to support 85,000 food-insecure households in the districts of Balaka, Chikwawa, Machinga, Mangochi, Nsanje, Phalombe, and Zomba through the construction or rehabilitation of assets that strengthen their resilience to climatic shocks. USAID/BHA has been supporting the U.N. World Food Programme’s Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) programming since 2017. This new contribution will enable targeted households to create productive community assets, such as fish farming ponds, micro-irrigation schemes, and flood-control dykes, among others, while they receive cash transfers to cover immediate food needs.

The contribution ($3 million) will also enable emergency food assistance to food-insecure households in the country. The Malawi Vulnerability Assessment Committee (MVAC), a government-led committee tasked with providing timely early warning information on food insecurity, estimates that 2.6 million people, nearly 15 percent of the country’s population, will face acute food insecurity during the 2020/2021 Lean Season. USAID/BHA contributions ($350,000) will also support MVAC functions in the coming months.

“The U.S. Government continues to help the people of Malawi avert hunger, build their resilience and improve their food security. We appreciate the U.S. Government’s support for our efforts to help break the cycle of hunger in Malawi,” says Benoit Thiry, U.N. World Food Programme Malawi Country Director.

“The increasing risk of climatic shocks to poor, rural households worsens their hunger situation. The U.S. Government has partnered with the U.N. World Food Programme to help poor households mitigate, manage, and endure the impacts of such shocks,” says Catie Lott, Mission Director for USAID/Malawi.

The U.S. is one of the largest donors to the U.N. World Food Programme in Malawi, contributing $46.9 million since 2017 to emergency response, support for refugees, and efforts to break the cycle of hunger. The U.N. World Food Programme is supporting the Government of Malawi through a range of programs, including emergency food assistance and cash-based transfers, nutritional support, and resilience-building.

 #                           #                            #

About the U.N. World Food Programme | The U.N. World Food Programme is the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate.  We are the world’s largest humanitarian organization, saving lives in emergencies and using food assistance to build a pathway to peace, stability and prosperity for people recovering from conflict, disasters and the impact of climate change. Our efforts focus on responding to emergencies while strengthening the Government’s social protection system; preventing chronic malnutrition; providing locally produced school meals; and building resilience of rural communities to be more self-reliant and equipped to face climatic shocks.

Follow us on Twitter @WFPUSA @wfp_media @wfp_Malawi

Read more about the U.N. World Food Programme’s resilience program here.

About USAID Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance (BHA) | Helping people affected by disasters and other humanitarian emergencies is at the core of what USAID’s Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance (BHA) does every day, all over the world. It reflects our values as Americans, demonstrates our global leadership, and makes the world a safer place. BHA leads and coordinates the U.S. Government’s disaster assistance efforts overseas. We also support food insecure refugees fleeing war, violence, or persecution.

Read more about BHA here.

WASHINGTON, DC (November 16, 2020) – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), in coordination with the government of Nicaragua, is preparing for a coordinated response to Hurricane Iota, which is forecast to hit Nicaragua as a Category 5 hurricane tonight, November 16. This new storm follows closely on the heels of Hurricane Eta, which affected millions of people on Nicaragua’s northeast coast, before continuing its destructive path through Central America and parts of the Caribbean. In Nicaragua, some 80,000 families are at risk, including in areas that were flooded by river overflow from Hurricane Eta.

A deadly, record-setting 2020 hurricane season in the Atlantic, coupled with the COVID-19 pandemic, has left a trail of devastation across Central American and the Caribbean, deepening hunger in communities already hard hit by years of prolonged drought and economic instability.

“The arrival of this new storm, when the population of the North Caribbean is just beginning to rise from the blow of Hurricane Eta, will have a strong impact. We are again in preparation as we continue to provide aid for families already affected. All the investment that can be made before the arrival of an event of this type is very valuable because it can save lives and provide a more efficient and faster response,” said Giorgia Testolin, U.N. World Food Programme’s Representative in Nicaragua.

The U.N. World Food Programme is reinforcing the technical teams that had been deployed to Nicaragua in anticipation of Hurricane Eta, in preparation for Iota. They are working to strengthen logistics, telecommunications and food security capacities in the three previously hardest hit municipalities, and where it is estimated that this new storm will cause the greatest impact.

The U.N. World Food Programme has shipped 275 metric tons of rice, beans and vegetable oil to the North Caribbean coast. Of these, 91 metric tons have been distributed to the population. Having food reserves in places where the hurricane is expected to hit is vital to the care of affected populations.

In addition, the United Nations Humanitarian Response Depot (UNHRD) in Panama has prepositioned non-food items—mobile storage units, generators, prefab offices, health kits, tents and more—that can be airlifted within 72 hours of a disaster in the region.

The U.N. World Food Programme also supports response efforts by providing drinking water and containers for storage, since many water sources have been affected by the floods. It has also provided fuel and motor oil for local authorities to mobilize boats to affected communities, as well as bio-protection equipment, such as surgical masks and alcohol for shelters. These items complement food packages and other resources provided by the Nicaraguan government.

#   #   #

The United Nations World Food Programme is the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate. We are the world’s largest humanitarian organization, saving lives in emergencies and using food assistance to build a pathway to peace, stability and prosperity for people recovering from conflict, disasters and the impact of climate change. | Follow us on Twitter @WFPUSA @wfp_media and @unmigration

ROME – Millions of people in Central America urgently need food assistance in the wake of Hurricane Eta, one of the worst storms in decades, as fears grow of another storm brewing in the coming days.

Heavy rains, high winds, deadly landslides and floods unleashed by Eta after making landfall in Nicaragua earlier this month killed dozens of people, destroyed infrastructure and hurt rural livelihoods along its path in Central America, including in Belize, Guatemala and Honduras.

“Eta arrived at the worst time, making life harder for millions of people already hard hit by years of erratic weather and the socioeconomic crisis COVID-19 caused. We are also concerned that more heavy rain and flooding can destroy the upcoming harvest subsistence farmers depend on to survive,” said Miguel Barreto, Regional Director for Latin America and the Caribbean.

Eta was the 28th hurricane in an already record-setting season. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration warns that there is a high chance another storm will form in the coming days.

The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) used internal resources to preposition food, scale up current operations focused on people affected by COVID-19, and mobilize teams to respond to the emergency in the most affected areas in Central America.

The hurricane compounds hunger already deepened by the coronavirus. Before the pandemic, the Dry Corridor of Central America (El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua) saw five years of prolonged drought and failed crops due to erratic weather patterns, which left smallholder farmers, day laborers and their families’ food insecure.

The U.N. World Food Programme predicts the number of people with severe food insecurity in the Dry Corridor could increase from more than 1.6 million in 2019 to close to 3 million in 2020, due to the socioeconomic fallout of COVID-19.

“To prevent the situation from becoming a larger humanitarian crisis, the U.N. World Food Programme calls for increased support from donors,” said Barreto.

An initial assessment indicates that our immediate funding needs to support the most vulnerable people are approximately  $13.2 million. This figure is expected to increase over the next few weeks as the extent of Eta’s impact becomes clearer.

Quality broadcast footage here

Photos available here

#                                              #                                              #

The United Nations World Food Programme is the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate. We are the world’s largest humanitarian organization, saving lives in emergencies and using food assistance to build a pathway to peace, stability and prosperity for people recovering from conflict, disasters and the impact of climate change. | Follow us on Twitter @WFPUSA and @wfp_media

For more information, contact:

  • Shaza Moghraby, WFP/New York, Shada.Moghraby@wfp.org, Mob. + 1 929 289 9867
  • Steve Taravella, WFP/ Washington, Steve.Taravella@wfp.org, Mob.  +1 202 770 5993
It looks like you're outside of the United States.

Are you alright with going to the

Continue Continue

Follow us on Twitter for the latest news on Ukraine.

Follow @wfpusa